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JFH Staff Blog | April 2014

Friday, April 25, 2014

20 Years Later - Dakoda Motor Co, 'Welcome Race Fans'

I was listening to a playlist of favorite songs on shuffle today when Dakoda Motor Co.'s "Truth" from their album Welcome Race Fans came on. Dakoda was another favorite of the early to mid-90s, and Welcome Race Fans marked the end of an era (despite a very brief one) for the band of surf rockers.

Dakoda Motor Co. debuted in 1991 with their album Into The Son, under the band name "Dakoda." They had to add "Motor Co." on the 1993 label release of the album for legal reasons. I remember seeing the video for "Grey Clouds" on then-popular Christian music video show Signal Exchange and really not liking the visuals for it (I totally love the song now though). However, their other video, "Sondancer," which was comprised of surf footage, coupled with hearing the music from friends who also liked them, helped turn me towards being an earnest Dakoda fan. It didn't hurt either that, in 1994, when I was really starting to get into Christian pop and rock music, that Welcome Race Fans struck a chord with me.

However, Welcome Race Fans was one of those albums that was hugely hit and miss for me. It's not often for me to find an album where I literally love half of it and don't care for most of the rest of it (or am on the fence about it). While I still enjoy Into the Son from front to back, Welcome Race Fans seemed to display the image of a band starting to stray pretty quickly from their roots. Their folksy, "Jesus Music" sound was mostly replaced by crunchy guitars, glistening production, and bizarre musical twists and turns. While this actually worked beautifully for album opener "Alive" and "Trip To Pain" (which saw a beautifully bizarre music video treatment from director/artist/producer Steve Taylor), songs like "Uglier," "Where Did It Go?" and "Rockin' In The Mall" just seemed far out of left field. To contrast, songs like "Love Runs Home," "Ooh, That Girl" and "Friend In My Eyes" seemed like the complete opposite end of the spectrum from the rockier tracks. They stripped it way back giving the album this uneven, schizophrenic vibe. It's as if you took a couple different projects and just shuffled songs from each one.

Around 1995, lead vocalist Davia Vallesillo left the band and was replaced by Melissa Brewer. (It was that version of DMC that I only saw live once. To this day, I never had the chance to see Davia perform with them.) Brewer would go on to record one album--and the band's final one--in 1996, titled Railroad, but Dakoda as fans knew and loved them would never be the same after Davia's departure. Around 2006, the band reunited with Davia and began playing shows again with the intentions of recording a new album (a brand new demo called "On My Way Home" could be heard on their Myspace page for a while), but they broke up in 2007 after realizing their schedules just weren't going to gel for the band to do music together again.

Welcome Race Fans still has some gems on it to this day, twenty years later. "Alive" is still one of my all-time favorites, with "Trip To Pain" being a close second to it. "Truth," "Free" and "Stand Up" are all also fun, upbeat tracks. If the album had been an EP of just these five songs, it'd have been one incredibly solid project. All of them are still in regular rotation for me.

Revisiting the rest of the album (which have spent years absent from my mp3 library): "Uglier" is a quirky, pop-punk number about Jesus bearing all of our faults and sin; "Love Runs Home" is a stripped-down acoustic pop love ballad that feels as though it snuck its way onto the wrong album; "Where Did It Go?" is a hyper pop punk track (where guitarist Peter King literally shouts gibberish repeatedly) that wears thin a little too quickly; "Ooh, That Girl" is a pop rock tune about admiring a girl whose faith radiates an attractive difference about her; "Friend In My Eyes" was an acoustic song (with horns?) that begged to become a wedding song; and "Rockin' In The Mall" is an under-2-minute finale that... was rockabilly. Some of these styles were prominent on their debut, but the rawness of that production (and Davia's layered vocals) worked in the favor of those songs. King also upped his vocal contributions on this album, stepping in to replace or sing with Davia more often.

While Welcome Race Fans doesn't exactly hold up as a whole 20 years later, it still has a few highlights that should not be overlooked. Dakoda Motor Co. was a talented bunch of Californians that went before their time. I would have loved to see Davia stick with the gang as they continued to make music. (And I would have LOVED to have heard a new album 7 years ago...) 

-- John DiBiase
Jesusfreakhideout.com Editor/Writer/Founder


You can find Welcome Race Fans on Amazon.com and AmazonMP3!

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Wednesday, April 23, 2014

20 Years Later - PFR, 'Great Lengths'

We recently took a look back at the release of Newsboys' Going Public album from twenty years ago, which has gotten me thinking more about other albums from 1994.

Let's flash back twenty years to a time when PFR was alive and kicking. This Minnesota pop rock trio was hailed as one of the best up-and-comings in CCM music. At this time in 1994, PFR had two solid albums under their belt -- the self-titled album Pray For Rain (side note: That was their band name when they debuted and they had to shorten it to "PFR" due to some other obscure band having the name and threatening to sue. Later copies of the self-titled had "PFR" stamped across the front) and its 1993 follow-up, Goldie's Last Day (which, incidentally was about a dog. I think it'd be almost impossible for a major label to release an album from a radio-ready band with a title like that. And yes, that thought just makes me sad).

In December, 1994, PFR released their third studio album, Great Lengths. Their harmonies often brought about comparisons with The Beatles and with the title track from this album, that only increased. One thing I loved so much about the music in the mid to late 90s was that Christian music was about the Christian life; it wasn't just manufactured to be performed by youth bands and worship leaders in church worship services. It was about the Christian lifestyle. It inspired how we lived, not just how we worshipped. It helped inspire us to live a life of worship. Thematically, each track of the album fit this: "Great Lengths" questioned our own tendencies to please ourselves instead of God; "Wonder Why" was about those who try to live their life feeling empty without trying Jesus as the answer; "Merry Go Round" was about forsaking rebellious living; "The Love I Know" was a reflection on disappointing human love versus the fulfilling love of Jesus; "It's You Jesus" was a quasi-worship song acknowledging His goodness; "Trials Turned To Gold" reflected on our transformation through Him; "Blind Man, Deaf Boy" also talked about living outside of His will; "See The Sun Again" addressed doubt and tough times in our walk; "The Grace of God" was about being rebuilt by His grace; "Last Breath" was a rocker about encouraging an unbeliever to consider where they'll go after death; and "Life Goes On," the closing ballad, wrapped things up with a worshipful way of acknowledging life's meaninglessness without Christ's love.

All of it is written in a relatable and down-to-earth way that most worship and radio pop seems to be missing these days. [But, obviously, I am probably in the minority in thinking that.] 20 years later, the lyrics to these songs endure far better than the music itself. The production is clean and crisp, and you'll hear incredible harmonies and melodies without an ounce of autotune or ProTools tinkering, but you'll also hear a sound more akin to 1994 than 2014. But that's not necessarily a bad thing.

Great Lengths was pop rock for fans of both the pop rock genre and somewhere in between contemporary and rock itself. If you like a little on both ends of the spectrum, you were likely to like PFR. I'd say fans of Audio Adrenaline, MercyMe... -- really any of today's pop rock or light rock artists. But lyrically, they're probably a little closer to a Foreman or a Thiessen than any of the given worship artists.

So where is PFR today? They reunited in 2012 for a run of shows and then were days away from launching a Kickstarter campaign last year for a new album before deciding they were forcing things and it wasn't meant to be. In that decision, they announced they were retiring the band permanently, much to the fans' intense disappointment. Frontman Joel Hanson continues to perform solo material, while I can't really say I know what Patrick Andrew and Mark Nash are doing these days (Although I think Mark remains involved in the studio and management side of things).

Great Lengths is still a gem worth digging into and unpacking lyrically 20 years later. It definitely aged stylistically, but for this 90s music listener, it's still a treasured listen. If you're more open minded about the sound of your brand of pop rock, do check this album out!  (And the autographed album cover poster is proudly displayed in the JFH office!) 

-- John DiBiase
Jesusfreakhideout.com Editor/Writer/Founder


You can find Great Lengths on iTunes!

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

Featured Fan - Erica Lysne


Erica and her sister Michelle with Building 429

Favorite Band/Artist:  Building 429
Featured Fan: Erica Lysne
Location: Luverne, MN
When/Where Was The Above Photo Taken:  We Won't be Shaken Tour: Sioux Falls, SD
What About This Artist's Music Speaks To You: I just love their music. It helps me get closer to God.
Favorite Album by This Artist:  We Won't Be Shaken
Favorite Song by This Artist: 
"Bonfire" and "We Won't Be Shaken"
Favorite Live Show Experience:
We Won't be Shaken Tour: Sioux Falls, SD  4/5/14
Number of Times Seen This Artist Live: 
3
Favorite Piece Of Merch/Item You Own From This Artist: 
my street team shirt
Website:
N/A

Submit your photo and reasons why YOU'RE a fan for a chance to be featured here!